Archive for the 'curds' Category

Rennet: how does it work, where does it come from?

January 17, 2012

Here is an excellent article from the latest issue of Culture Magazine where they examine rennet’s role in cheesemaking.

http://culturecheesemag.com/cheese_iq/winter_2011/rennets_role

Check it out!

Let me introduce you to Monforte’s Athena

November 29, 2011

CurdyGirl visits a local cheesemaker at Toronto’s historic St. Lawrence Market on a Saturday morning, and tries their latest creation, Athena!

Fox Hill Cheese House – Fenugreek Havarti

November 2, 2011

Rick from the Fox Hill Cheese House in Nova Scotia was the nicest cheesemaker I had the pleasure of meeting on my recent trip to Halifax. This delightful, family-run, farmstead business is quality through and through.  Sustainable farming practices are employed; they proudly plant the seed, grow the grass, milk the cows, and make fantastic cheese, yogurt, gelato and milk.  This is a textbook example of a cheesemaker that focuses on producing good milk which is of course the lifeblood of good cheese.

Tea and Cheese pairing exploration

October 13, 2011

Tea and Cheese pairing exploration

 

This is a study I did earlier this summer for a complex pairings course. 

Teas and cheeses can be very successful partners in a pairing situation.  Black teas and green teas offer greater chances for success, while white tea and herbals offer the least. Strive for balance; too strong of a tea will overwhelm the cheese, and likewise, too strong a cheese will overpower a tea.  By playing with the different aromas and flavours of teas and cheeses, great discoveries can be made.  When brewing tea, it is crucial to pay attention to the recommended steeping times and temperatures to allow for full expression of the tea.

Caerphilly, a Canadian interpretation of a Welsh classic!

October 12, 2011

Caerphilly is the only traditional cheese associated with Wales, though the one profiled here was made in Nova Scotia, Canada. It’s a bright, lemony cheese that is great for snacking, drinking with a lovely wheat beer or in a sandwich or burger with mustard. No wonder this was a staple in miners’ lunches!